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20110701
20110731
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
against al qaeda and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those aeas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces aghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the coander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines andanbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a
and cut out. >>> the u.s. may decide to withhold millions in military aid to pakistan. this is according to a "new york times" report. the u.s. is said to be unhappy with the efforts that pakistani army has been making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got
of the sanctuary across the border in pakistan. >> until the problem of insurgent and terror sanctuary in pakistan is effectively addressed and that can be addressed through military means. it can be addressed through political means or a combinations there of which is very much of our approach. until that problem has been satisfactorily addressed, then our enterprise in afghanistan and the long-term stability of afghanistan remains at risk. they look across the border into pakistan and see sanctuary there. they see enemy capability there. they see enemy leaders that are there that are not being hit right now. so their question is, why do we need 100,000 american troops inside of afghanistan when we know that a very big part of this problem sits inside of pakistan? >> reporter: a grim reality right there from the ambassador as he leaves afghanistan where he says that he will leave a part of his heart behind. chuck? >> all right. atia in kabul. thanks very much. >> those u.s. drone attacks in afghanistan have killed 45 militants in the last 24 hours. it comes a day after washington announced it wou
laden's compound in pakistan and terror group is now within reach. david is live from kabul, afghanistan. >> reporter: the duly appointed defense secretary arrived here a few hours ago to find out for himself the situation on the ground here. he has brief talks with military officials including david petraeus and then he went straight into a meeting with the afghan president hamid karzai. their discussions included the transition of nato held areas of afghan control starting in july but also the drawdown of u.s. troops over the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's
million in military aide to pakistan. relations between the two countries took a major hit after u.s. forces killed osama bin laden in pakistan. that was back in may. those ties are on even shake yes, sir ground. peter doocy has more from washington. >> reporter: $800 million less. that is what pakistan is going to be getting us from military aide, getting shaved off the 2 plus billion, now the white house says is because they could be more helpful in rounding up terrorists and they gave hundred u.s. army trainers the boot in the last few weeks. >> obviously they have been an important ally but they have been a victim of enormous amounts of terrorism but they have taken steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were given to their military. >> the communication breakdown regarding our raid on their soil to kill bin laden, some critics say maybe they knew there was all along. brand-new secretary of defense, l leon panetta says we don't know enough yet. >> everybody has suspicions about pakistanis, what they knew reality is their are investigations being co
panetta visited in afghanistan. he failed to visit pakistan. what do you think that says about the tension? >> the tension is quite high. frankly unless there is some reversal and lowering of the rhetoric, then i think it's going to spin in a very deep decline. that's not something that's in pakistan's interest on the united states. you need to keep conversations as private as possible sending very strong messages but if we continue to vent our frustrations mutual frustrations ours with the pakistanis and what they have done and fail to do theirs with us in terms of us trying to micro manage what they're doing, then your going to have a break or breach in that relationship. pakistan is a major non-nato ally. allies don't allow things to happen like the hosting of the con sealing of bin laden or the arresting of those who help take bin laden down or allegedly the targeting for assassination of a journalist who's been critical of the regime. these are not the acts of allies. we've got to get back to a level of respect and trust i think that's lacking right now. as a result the relationship i
the u.s. and pakistan have been even more tense since bin laden was killed. today, word tensions may have reached a new high. plus in the race for the white house, new hampshire, of course, a key stop. congressman with local roots will share his insight on which contenders could see success in his state. stay with us. [ mom ] one of the challenges for kayla being gluten-free is actually finding choices the whole family will love. five flavors of chex are gluten-free, including the honey nut flavor. and it's nice for me to be able to syes" to something that they want to eat. [ male announcer ] chex cereal. five flavor gluten free to something that they want to eat. funny thing about vegetables... they fill you up without filling you out. yes! v8 juice gives you three of your five daily servings of vegetables. that's what i'm talking about! v8. what's your number? a living, breathing intelligence that's helpi drive the future of business. in here, inventory can be taught to learn. ♪ machines have a voice. ♪ medical history follows you. it's the at&t network -- a network of possibil
the remaining leaders. >> somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders that between pakistan, yemen, somalia, aqim and north africa, those are -- if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the new al-qaeda chief continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he said he believes the al-qaeda leader may well be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas. and general petraeus, who leaves his post here this month to head the c.i.a., also said today, al-qaeda was on the run, in his opinion. enormous damage is being done to the al-qaeda network over the border in pakistan. back to you. >> rick: david piper on the phone from kabul for us. thanks for the update. >> rick: getting the royal treatment, a polo club in california hosting a future king, prince william is taking part in a charity polo match right now and his new bride, the duchess of cambridge is on hand cheering him on. the royal couple mingling with hollywood royalty on their trip to the u.s. casey stegall live in santa barbara. who is a
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
. pakistan is a good example of a country where information sharing among known and suspected terrorists is still lacking. >> it is stunning that pakistan, which is supposed to be our ally in the war against terrorism, does not even share fingerprint data within its own government. it doesn't share it with other pakistanis -- pakistani law enforcement agencies. that's a real problem. >> reporter: so the bottom line is that we can pour billions of dollars into our airport security but the overall system, of course, is only as good as the weakest link, gregg. gregg: the senator said this issue is more now. what has changed in that regard? >> >> reporter: let's take the example of the underwear bomber, it's a good example of a foreign national, in this case a nigerian, who came through yemen and on to amsterdam before he boarded a flight on christmas day in 2009, the american cleric, anwar al-awlaki, the first american on the kill or capture list was the first man there, abdulmutallab, and the bomb maker. >> the threat is far more diverge than it was -- diverse than it was a decade ago. now
afghanistan, pakistan. you're reading a couple pieces in the "new york times." now it's spreading to all of these different countries and one that really jumped off the page for me, drone attacks in somalia. >> joining us, jeremy scahill, on the cia secret sites in somalia, jeremy, the secret training programs and secret prisons out of somalia is part of your reporting there. how big a threat are these terrorist group there's? >> we should say first of all president obama campaigned on a promise to go up against these bush era policies declaring war on the world, running secret sites, torturing prisoners. deeply involved in an underground dungeon officially run by the somali national security agency, but their salaries are paid by the cia directly. in fact, one somali agent described thousand hairli ed ho and paid by u.s. agents and the u.s. is interrogating prisoners, including those rendered by the kenyan government, snatched off the streets in nairobi based on u.s. intelligence and taken to this secret prison and interrogated. it goes against the president's ordered he signed in janua
campaign been ongoing in pakistan and some cases yemen, we've taken out something like 1200 fighters from al qaeda including senior leaders. jon: right. >> this is all good news. but again the ideology of radical islam lives on and so do these affiliate groups. that is the challenge ahead of us. jon: if you take out those leaders, and we have been very successful in doing that, if you take out people who have experience going back to the russian-afghan war, take out the people who know how to motivate and organization and maybe build a bomb be, pretty soon you're left with bunch of 18, 20-year-old kids who may have the desire but don't necessarily have the knowledge to continue terrorism campaign? >> well, you know i think you could make that argument but you could also argue you have a number of people who gained experience in afghanistan. people who have gained experience and by the way, fighting in this more recent war, not in the war in the 1980s against the soviets. but rather fighting against the united states and allied forces. you have people that have had experience in iraq and o
, israel, indonesia and pakistan. interestingly enough, 75% of people in egypt said arabs not responsible for 9/11. >> should we cue up some bin laden tapes where he's admitting the entire thing or khali shaikh mohammed talking about how the plot was put together or the video confessions of those suicide -- of the suicide terrorists before they died? i mean, would that help? that's not even a tough question. >> it isn't a tough question. >> yet the disconnect continues to be there. we always hear that, it makes no sense obviously to us here. meanwhile, let's get to your headlines. >> we will indeed. defense lawyers plan to present an insanity defense today in the arkansas murder trial of abdul akim muhammad accused of killing one soldier and wounding another outside an army recruiting station in little rock. muhammad insists he's not insane and claims his actions were justified by the quran. >> a texas man who was kidnapped has been found dead in mexico. police say he was murdered after his family could not pay a $10,000 ransom. he worked as a federal court interpreter in el paso and was
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)